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As a strong El Nino fades, the weather across the country will slowly change. In much of the eastern United States, a hot summer is in store. Rain and...
<p>Alberta declared a state of emergency Wednesday as crews frantically held back wind-whipped wildfires that have already torched 1,600 homes and other buildings in Canada's main oil sands city of Fort McMurray, forcing more than 80,000 residents to flee.</p>
If you missed out on seeing Halley's Comet during its last Earth flyby in 1986, don't despair — you can spot tiny pieces of the icy...
Using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, WeatherDB found the 50 counties with the best weather.
As millions prepare to celebrate Mother's Day on Sunday, May 8, rain and severe storms threaten to disrupt outdoor activities and travel plans. Whether...
<p>Southern California’s section of the San Andreas Fault is “locked, loaded and ready to roll,” a leading earthquake scientist said Wednesday at the National Earthquake Conference in Long Beach.</p>
Hundreds of buildings were reported damaged after a wildfire forced the evacuation of the entire town of Fort McMurray, Alberta, on Tuesday, May 3. Authorities reported 88,000 people evacuated from the town without injury, and videos from the scene show people driving by the fire as it crept closer to the roadways.Local media reported the fire had grown to 10,000 hectares, which is approximately 24,700 acres. Additionally, authorities reported 1,600 buildings had been destroyed by the fire. Credit: YouTube/Jason Edmondson
<p>Some communities along the southern Atlantic Seaboard will be hit hard with thunderstorms into the middle of the week.</p>
Nickolay Lamm Sea levels are rising several times faster today than at any other point in roughly the last 3,000 years, according to new research.Scientists project that if humans don't get control over greenhouse gas emission levels, then sea levels could rise by as much as 3-4 feet by the year 2100.Sea levels rise because of melting glaciers and ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica as a result of warming temperatures. The ocean also expands as it warms.Rising sea levels make coastal areas, particularly those with dense populations, much more vulnerable to heavy flooding.Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm, from StorageFront.com, previously created sea-level rise maps to show what major US monuments would look like over the next century if we continue on a business-as-usual track. Lamm used data provide by Climate Central to build his sea level maps.The hypothetical scenes show icons, like the Statue of Liberty and the Washington Monument, and depict four levels of flooding at each landmark: 0 feet; 5 feet (possible in 100 to 300 years); 12 feet (possible by about 2300); and 25 feet (possible in the coming centuries):
What Mother Nature didn't destroy when 18 inches of flood water filled the home of Lennie and Amber Ambrose, looters stole less than 24 hours later. Heirlooms, jewelry and electronics - all were gone. Months earlier they had planned to move a block away into their dream home, but the flood claimed that residence as well, and the sale was canceled. Located in Houston's Greater Inwood area, Candlelight Forest is a neighborhood of about 150 ...
<p>Seawater — increasingly acidic due to global warming — is eating away a tiny part of the limestone framework for coral reef in the upper Florida Keys, according to a new study. It's something that scientists had expected, but not so soon.</p>
Residents of drought-stricken California doubled their water conservation efforts in March compared with the month before by turning off their sprinklers when the rain fell and changing habits, officials said Tuesday.
With the return of wet weather in the Northeast, many people are asking: When will the rain go away? Up until last week, much of the Northeast needed rainfall.
<p>"This discrepancy between observed satellites and predicted abundances has been a major problem in cosmology for nearly two decades, even called a 'crisis' by some researchers," said team member Neal Dalal, of the University of Illinois.</p>
A $48 million grant for Isle de Jean Charles, La., is the first allocation of federal tax dollars to move an entire community struggling with the effects of climate change.
A storm will deliver several days of much-needed rain to the drought-stricken western United States late this week. However, rain could be heavy enough...
The Middle East, north Africa, central Asia and south Asia due to suffer biggest economic hit from water scarcity as climate change takes hold, report finds
Next week, on Monday, May 9, skywatchers on Earth will be able to see Mercury make its way across the surface of the sun. The so-called...
Earth has a new lightning hotspot and it's not located in Florida or Africa according to a new study.
<p>Clouds might seem like a nuisance if you’re headed on a Sunday afternoon picnic. But put aside your personal biases for a second and consider this: clouds can also tell the story of life on earth. That story has become a lot clearer thanks to new maps created by scientists that document a global year in the clouds in more intimate detail than ever before. The maps — a cloud atlas if you will — provide a fine-grained view of how clouds move around in our atmosphere and represent an important link between climate and ecological research. They’re also pretty easy on the eyes.</p>
The big question at Palau's Jellyfish Lake: Where are all the jellyfish?
In the early morning of Feb. 29, park officials, tourists and locals near Mount Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of Congo heard an unfamiliar sound: rumbling. What they were hearing was the sound of earthquakes deep below the surface. The movement knocked giant rocks off of the crater walls. And at the same time, a new vent appeared on a ledge. Since that day, the vent explodes about every 30 seconds, throwing...
Astronomers searching for life beyond our solar system may need to look no farther than a little, feeble nearby star.
The Middle East and North Africa are already some of the hottest places are Earth. In Riyadh, Saudi Arabia daily high temperatures can exceed 40°C…
Hawaii, Alaska and the Southwest face an above-average threat of wildfires this summer, but most of the country should see normal or below-normal problems, forecasters said Sunday.The...
<p>Located near the border of Ethiopia and Eritrea, the Danakil Depression has beautiful landscapes, but is incredibly dangerous to travel to. The temperature during the day hovers around 107 degrees Fahrenheit, even in early spring. It's dry, and sulfur and chlorine cloud the air, burning the lungs of people unfortunate enough to be close to the boiling hot springs, roiling with salt, and heated by magma deep in the Earth. Welcome to the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia. It's 328 feet below sea level, volcanically active, a home to salt traders and sought out by adventurers.</p>
<p>Warm ocean waters that sucked the color and vigor from sweeping stretches of the world’s greatest expanse of corals last month were driven by climate change, according to a new analysis by scientists, who are warning of worse impacts ahead. Climate change made it 170 times more likely that the surface waters of the Coral Sea, which off the Queensland coastline is home to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, would reach the record-breaking temperatures last month that bleached reefs, modeling analysis showed.</p>
<p>When NASA's Kepler spacecraft launched in 2009, its mission was to find other worlds akin to Earth orbiting the immense number of stars in the Milky Way galaxy.</p>
Climate change could put certain species of African antelopes at risk of extinction, particularly those with the smallest geographic ranges, says a study released Thursday.
Astronomers have found a first-of-its-kind tailless comet whose composition may offer clues into long-standing questions about the solar system's formation and evolution, according to research published on Friday in the journal Science Advances.
As we arrive at the midpoint of the spring season, we examine some of the prominent stars and constellations (and planets)...
The otherworldly event is forecast to arrive from a “solar sector boundary crossing.”
Nuclear war. Climate change. Pandemics that kill tens of millions. These are the most viable threats to globally organized civilization. They’re the stuff of nightmares and blockbusters—but unlike sea monsters or zombie viruses, they’re real, part of the calculus that political leaders consider everyday. And according to a new report from the UK-based Global Challenges Foundation, they’re much more likely than we might think. In its annual report ...
<p>Nickolay Lamm In 2006, a white bear with brown splotches, believed to be a hybrid of a polar bear and a grizzly, was shot by Arctic hunters. Then in 2009, a possible hybrid of a right whale and a bowhead was photographed...</p>
Withering drought and sizzling temperatures from El Nino have caused food and water shortages and ravaged farming across Asia, and experts warn of a double-whammy of possible flooding from its sibling, La Nina.
<p>From heat wave in India to cherry blossoms in Japan, a look at the best of the weather pictures from the month of April.</p>
Last winter's East Coast blizzard has set another record, in New York City, while a record in Newark, New Jersey, was deleted, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday in a report prompted by questions about the accuracy of snowfall measurements.The review also found that widely reported suspicions about a 17.8-inch measurement at Reagan National Airport near Washington were unfounded. Although substantially lower than readings within the District of Columbia, the number was close to totals from nearby sites...
The excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has created a greener planet, a new NASA study shows. Around the world, areas that were once icebound,...
Climate change is exposing millions of workers to excessive heat, risking their health and income and threatening to erase more than $2.0 trillion in annual productivity by 2030, a UN report warned Thursday.More than one billion workers in countries hard-hit by global warming are already grappling with increasing severe heat, according to the report: "Climate Change and Labour: Impacts of Heat in the Workplace.""Already in the current situation, several percent of working hours can be lost in highly exposed regions," said the report, a collaboration between several UN agencies and international unions.The global productivity loss is expected to top $2.0 trillion annually by 2030, as sweltering temperatures force outdoor workers and manual labourers to slow down, take longer breaks or even move to find work in a cooler climate."When workers are put under these hot-house conditions, their capacity to work is dramatically impacted," Philip Jennings, head of UNI Global Union, told AFP.Working in temperatures over 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) is considered health hazardous.Some labourers exposed to such conditions have no choice but to continue working, sometimes without access to drinking water or shade to cool off in. "Those who work in the fields may ruin their health just by trying to put a meal on the table," Saleemul Huq, head of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development, warned in a statement.An estimated four billion people live in the areas most exposed to climate change.Those regions include much of southern Asia, the southern United States, Central America and the Caribbean, northern South America and north and west Africa.In West Africa, the number of very hot days each year has already doubled since the 1960s, with an increase of around 10 additional hot days each decade, the report said.And in Kolkata, India, each decade brings an additional 12 days where the mercury soars above 29 C, it said.India has already lost around three percent of available daylight working hours annually due to extreme heat, and without dramatic action to rein in global warming could be looking at eight percent respectively by 2085, the report showed.The report comes after 160 nations last week signed a historic agreement reached in Paris aimed at keeping a rise in global temperatures below 1.5 degrees Celsius.But experts warn that capping the global temperature rise at that level will be difficult, with many expecting at least a 2 C rise. And if the world does not act to rein in greenhouse gas emissions, scientists say the world is heading for a 4 C warmer world.Thursday's report warned that even if global leaders manage to limit warming to 1.5 C, some of the hardest-hit areas will see an entire month of added extreme heat in 2030 compared to 2010.
<p>On the evening of April 17, the Solar Dynamics Observatory observed the solar dynamic above, and captured rather beautiful false-color 4K video of it. Solar flares are caused--in some way--by magnetic disturbances in the sun, and can interfere with electromagnetic transmissions here on Earth, like the one you're probably watching the video on right now.</p>
A massive newly discovered lake may lie below the surface of Antarctica’s ice sheet, according to researchers. 
One homeowners’ association has even ordered residents to green up their lawns.
Hail begins when so-called embryos of supercooled water form ice crystals. Imagine that an ice crystal is the ball in a game of meteorologic ping-pong played vertically.
<p>The percentage of conservative Republicans who consider global warming a threat shot up 19 points in two years, to 47 percent, according to public opinion researchers at Yale University and George Mason University. Overall, 56 percent of Republicans agree that it’s happening. Including Democrats and independents, the national average for the U.S. is 73 percent.</p>
Was your heating bill a bit friendlier to your wallet this winter? If so, there’s a good chance you can thank El Niño. 
A new effort is underway to build more disaster-resistant homes in the central United States, an area more prone to tornadoes and severe weather. The...
About 330 million people, almost a quarter of the country's population, are hit by India's worst drought in four decades.
More than half of all Americans live in areas that have dangerously high levels of either ozone or particle pollution.
<p>A striking new image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope delivers a deep look into a mysterious cosmic object called the Red Rectangle Nebula.</p>
The National Weather Service was warning of the possibility of hail as big as grapefruits in some areas on Tuesday amid storms in parts of the central and eastern U.S. Some smaller hail — the size of quarters or smaller — had been reported in Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Ohio and Texas as of Tuesday afternoon. Large hail can cause heavy damage to...
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